Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart

1897-1939

I guess I helped women believe that they can fly high, if they wish so. I was a pioneer in aviation, because I was a woman. This was the beginning of the 20th century and women were not supposed to enjoy planes. I was the first person to fly alone above the Atlantic Ocean. I am proud of that. I was also a defender of women’s rights and got involved with the “Ninety-Nines”, an association devoted to raise the morale of women who wanted to become pilots. I wrote many books about my passion and always fought to pursue my dreams. I guess what my life shows is that we just need to believe in ourselves and be courageous. If for that one needs to defy conventions, just don’t let fear stop you.

Amelia Earhart

Elizabeth Robinson

1911-1999

I was the first woman ever to win a gold medal for the Olympic 100 m for women. I was just 16. I was inexperienced and young, next to my peers at this run, but I won. How I got here is a funny story. I was running after a train and my teacher saw me. He timed me and gave me my first training in sprinting. This is how started my athlete career. After my success in the 1928 Olympics, I continued to run in school and college tournaments, bringing home records. In the outdoor nationals of 1929, the chairman of the national committee on women’s athletics thought he was being complementary when he wrote “the most sensational performances of the meet” from “the slim, smiling Chicago girl, who runs like a man”. Hmmm, like a man? No way, I ran proudly like a girl! Everything was going well. I loved what I was doing. But in 1931, I was in a plane crash. After being in a coma, I was forced to drop my participation in the 1932 Olympics because I was in a wheelchair. I worked hard and managed to recover from this near tragedy. It was a slow and painful way out, but my passion for running helped me surpass all this and I tried for the 1936’s Olympics. It was such a struggle, I had to work overtime, but I did it!

Amelia Earhart
Amelia Earhart

Olympe de Gouges

1748-1793

I lived in the 18th century and was quite revolutionary for the time. I was a French activist, wrote plays and was very politically engaged. My writings have reached many people and countries. The Declaration of the Rights of Women and the Female Citizen was my most important work. I was practically a sole voice at the time and my intentions dictated my end. I was the only woman to be executed for my political writings during the French Revolution. Throughout my lifetime, I consistently fought for the freedom of speech and its importance in social and political critique, as well as for the equality of rights between women and men. So, this is why I’ve been at the forefront of feminism and opened the doors for others to create feminist movements around the globe.

Amelia Earhart

Sojourner Truth

1797-1883

I am known for being a powerful anti-slavery spokesperson. I managed to escape slavery and went to Canada, bringing only my youngest son with me. After the abolition in New York, in 1829, I returned. You know, since I was young, I had visions and heard voices, which I felt came from God. I decided to change my name from Isabella to Sojourner Truth and left New York to preach in camps, churches and streets spreading the message of God, kindness and brotherhood. And that naturally led to my fight for women’s rights. As a human rights advocate in 19th century America, I delivered what is now recognized as one of the most famous abolitionist and women’s rights speeches in American history - “Ain’t I a Woman?”. I continued to speak out for these causes during the Civil War and died in 1883. But I like to believe, as I once said, that I haven’t died. I “went home like a shooting star”.

Amelia Earhart